NPR Picks

Wednesday
Jan242018

Philippine Volcano Erupts, Causing 56,000 To Flee

"Mount Mayon, the Philippines' most active volcano, erupted for eight minutes on Monday afternoon, spewing a 3-mile-tall column of debris and volcanic gas. It exploded at least five more times Monday night and Tuesday morning."

"'The lava fountains reached 500 meters to 700 meters [1,640 feet to 2,297 feet] high and generated ash plumes that reached 2.5 kilometers to 3 kilometers [1.6 miles to 1.9 miles] above the crater,' reported the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology."

"The institute said two 'explosion-type earthquakes' had occurred, as well as 18 tremor events — some of which sent forth fountains of lava. One of the lava flows advanced nearly 2 miles from the summit's crater."

"Authorities raised the volcano's alert level to 4 out of a possible 5, indicating "intense unrest" and the possibility of a hazardous eruption within days. The alert extends the danger zone around Mayon to approximately 5 miles."

Tuesday
Jan232018

What Do Asthma, Heart Disease And Cancer Have In Common? Maybe Childhood Trauma

"'Trauma' is a heavy and haunting word. For many Americans, it conjures images of troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The emotional toll from those wars made headlines and forced a healthcare reckoning at the Department of Veterans Affairs."

"Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, a pediatrician, would like to see a similar reckoning in every doctor's office, health clinic and classroom in America — for children who have experienced trauma much closer to home."

"Burke Harris is the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness in San Francisco. She's spent much of her career trying to spread awareness about the dangers of childhood toxic stress. Her 2014 TED talk on the subject has more than 3.5 million views; the message is simple and research-based:"

"Two-thirds of Americans are exposed to extreme stress in childhood, things like divorce, a death in the family or a caregiver's substance abuse. And this early adversity, if experienced in high enough doses, "literally gets under our skin, changing people in ways that can endure in their bodies for decades," Burke Harris writes in her new book, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity."

Monday
Jan222018

Amazon's Cashier-Less Seattle Grocery Opens To The Public

"Amazon on Monday will open its automated grocery in Seattle to the public, replacing cashiers with a smartphone app and hundreds of small cameras that track purchases."

"For the past year, the 1,800-square foot mini-mart has been open to the company's employees."

"There is no waiting in line for check out at Amazon Go, as the store is called – instead, its computerized system charges the customer's Amazon account as they exit the store."


Sunday
Jan212018

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

"The man was unconscious and alone when he arrived at University of Miami Hospital last summer. He was 70 years old and gravely ill."

"'Originally, we were told he was intoxicated,' remembers Dr. Gregory Holt, an emergency room doctor, 'but he didn't wake up.'"

"'He wasn't breathing well. He had COPD. These would all make us start to resuscitate someone,' says Holt. "But the tattoo made it complicated.'"

"The tattoo stretched across the man's chest. It said "Do Not Resuscitate." His signature was tattooed at the end."

"'We were shocked,' remembers Holt. 'We didn't know what to do.'"

"The tattoo, and the hospital's decision about what it required of them, has set off a conversation among doctors and medical ethicists around the country about how to express one's end-of-life wishes effectively, and how policymakers can make it easier."

Saturday
Jan202018

Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their Secrets

"A tablespoon of soil contains billions of microscopic organisms. Life on Earth, especially the growing of food, depends on these microbes, but scientists don't even have names for most of them, much less a description."

"That's changing, slowly, thanks to researchers like Noah Fierer, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Fierer think microbes have lived in obscurity for too long. 'They do a lot of important things for us, directly or indirectly, and I hope they get the respect they deserve,' he says."

"'These microbes create fertile soils, help plants grow, consume and release carbon dioxide, oxygen and other vital elements. But they do it all anonymously. Scientists haven't identified most of these species and don't know much else about them, either, such as "what they're doing in soil, how they're surviving, what they look like,' Fierer says."

"According to Fierer, they've been extremely difficult to study, in part, because most of them refuse to grow anywhere but in the dirt, 'so we can't take them out of soil and study them in the lab.'"

Friday
Jan192018

Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

"Researchers say they have taken a step toward developing a blood test that would detect eight common cancers, possibly even before symptoms appear."

"As they report Thursday in the journal Science, they're hoping their idea would eventually lead to a $500 test that can screen for cancer and identify people with the disease when it's in its earliest stages and more treatable."

"But they have a long way to go."

"There have been many attempts over the decades to develop blood tests to screen for cancers. Some look for proteins in the blood that appear with cancer. Others more recently have focused on DNA from tumors. But these methods alone don't give reliable results."

"So Nickolas Papadopoulos, a professor of oncology and pathology at the Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, collaborated with many colleagues at the medical school to develop a new approach. It combines two methods into one test."

 

Thursday
Jan182018

2017 Among Warmest Years On Record

"2017 was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration."

"The planet's global surface temperature last year was second warmest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, due to slight variation in the ways that they analyze temperatures."

"'Both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken place since 2010,' NASA said in a press release."

"The trend is seen most dramatically in the Arctic, NASA says, as sea ice continues to melt."

"Despite colder than average temperatures in any one part of the world, temperatures over the planet as a whole continue the rapid warming trend we've seen over the last 40 years," said Gavin Schmidt, the director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

Wednesday
Jan172018

Too Much Music: A Failed Experiment In Dedicated Listening

"In Clint Eastwood's 1988 film Straight No Chaser, Thelonious Monk road manager Bob Jones tells a story about Monk appearing on a television show sometime in the late '50s. Monk is asked what kind of music he likes, to which he replies 'all kinds.' The interviewer, hoping for a "gotcha" moment, smugly asks "even country?" to which the maverick pianist coolly deadpans, 'I said all kinds.'"

"Me too. It has been said that we are living in a golden age of music fandom; with a single click, we can access almost every piece of music ever recorded, and for less than it would cost to hear a single song on a jukebox in 1955. But I've begun to feel that my rabid consumption of music, when coupled with the unprecedented access encouraged by new technology, has endangered my ability to process it critically."

"Streaming has become the primary way we listen to music: in 2016, streaming surpassed both physical media and digital downloads as the largest source of recorded music sales. There are plenty of valid complaints about a music world dominated by streaming. Among the many arguments musicians level against Spotify, for example, one typically repeated is that the artist is the only link in the food chain getting the proverbial shaft. This argument is often predicated on notions of economics, intellectual property and ethics. Missing from a larger discussion is the radical idea that maybe it is the consumers who are being done the greatest disservice, and that this access-bonanza may be cheapening the listening experience by transforming fans into file clerks and experts into dilettantes. I don't want my musical discoveries dictated by a series of intuitive algorithms any more than I want to experience Jamaica via an all-inclusive trip to Sandals."

 

Tuesday
Jan162018

Google App Goes Viral Making An Art Out Of Matching Faces To Paintings

"Who can say why some gimmicks take off and others flop? But the Google Arts & Culture app tapped into the zeitgeist over the weekend, until it seemed like just about everyone with access to a camera phone and a social media account was seeking and sharing their famous painting doppelganger."

"Forget the fact that Google launched the app and online page in 2016, allowing users to browse a trove of artwork sourced from hundreds of museums worldwide. It was the portrait feature included in last month's update that has spun the selfies into overdrive."

"The metric site App Annie said Google Arts & Culture was the No. 1 free app over the weekend. And by Monday, it was still holding on to the spot."

"Perhaps users can't resist the vain pleasure of seeing and showcasing their own visages reflected back in a famous work of art."

Sunday
Jan142018

Behind The Genius Of Guinness, Ireland's Most Popular Tourist Attraction

"When it comes to tourism, Ireland punches well above its weight."

"Last year, the tourists who visited the island outnumbered residents by about 3 million. They went to see the Cliffs of Moher, Blarney Castle and the Ring of Kerry, the 111-mile scenic circular route in the southwest. But the biggest attraction was the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin."

"One of the first things you notice when you walk into the storehouse is a waterfall bathed in blue light — a symbol of the water from the nearby Wicklow Mountains that Guinness uses to brew its stout."

"The storehouse is a cross between a museum and an interactive marketing campaign."

"Upstairs, ingredients are vaporized so that visitors can smell individual flavors."

"Colm O'Connor, a beer specialist, explains some of the aromas: 'This is hops. I'm getting slightly grassy notes. Floral, it would definitely remind you of the garden. In terms of flavor, it's going to give a bitterness.'"

Saturday
Jan132018

Scientists Say A Fluctuating Jet Stream May Be Causing Extreme Weather Events

"A new study suggests that the polar jet stream has been fluctuating more than normal as it passes over the parts of the Northern Hemisphere, and that's affecting weather in Europe and North America."

"The jet stream is like a river of wind that circles the Northern Hemisphere continuously. That river meanders north and south along the way, however. When those meanders occur over the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans, it can alter pressure systems and wind patterns at lower latitudes in Europe and North America. And that affects how warm or rainy it is on those continents."

"Researchers at the University of Arizona and the Swiss Federal Research Institute studied tree rings to get a fix on how widely and how often the jet stream meanders."

"Biologist Valerie Trouet took samples from four species of trees in Europe, including Scots pine, dating back to 1725. These revealed what kind of weather Europe had each year. And that helped them establish the normal pattern of the jet stream's fluctuations."

 

Friday
Jan122018

Science Says That To Fight Ignorance, We Must Start By Admitting Our Own

"Science is not a philosophy or a spiritual path; it's a way of behaving in the world."

"But since tribalism and polarization have made "alternative facts" a reality of public life, there is something we can learn from science to help us navigate the troubled waters and find a more resilient civic life."

"The lesson begins with understanding the right relationship not to knowing but to not knowing. To be blunt, if we want to fight ignorance, we must start with our own."

"Last year, I wrote about the dangerous public turn away from expertise. As Tom Nichols wrote in his book The Death of Expertise, we've found ourselves in a strange position in which people who know almost nothing about difficult and complicated subjects are righteous in their rejection of others who have spent years studying those very same fields."

Thursday
Jan112018

Environmentalists Warn Of Mediterranean Pollution From Lebanon Land Reclamation

"On a bright, beautiful October day, Lebanese fisherman Emilio Eid is in his boat on the Mediterranean Sea. Lebanon's scenic mountain ranges are clear in the distance."

"But the water around him is brown and littered with pieces of floating plastic. He spots bottles, a toothbrush, a used condom. An acrid smell burns his eyes and throat."

"Eid says, and turns to look toward the coast."

"There, a huge mound rises out of the water. A steady stream of trucks drives onto it, emptying loads of waste onto compressed trash and dirt extending hundreds of feet into the Mediterranean."

"It is a form of land reclamation – the process of adding to the coastline. In this case, the process involves dumping thousands of tons of trash directly into the sea."

Wednesday
Jan102018

What You Need To Know About This Year's Flu Season

"Aja C. Holmes planned to go to work last week, but her flu symptoms — a cough, fever and severe body aches that worsened overnight — had other ideas."

"'It felt like somebody took a bat and beat my body up and down,' said Holmes, 39, who works as a residential life director at California State University, Sacramento. 'I couldn't get out of bed.'"

"The nation is having a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad flu season."

"Flu is widespread in 46 states, including California, according to the latest reports to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."

"Nationally, as of mid-December, at least 106 people had died from the infectious disease, according to the CDC. At least 27 Californians younger than 65 had died as of Friday, seven of them during the week before Christmas, according to the California Department of Public Health. And states across the country are reporting higher-than-average flu-related hospitalizations and emergency room visits."

Tuesday
Jan092018

New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 Billion

"Before it got cold this winter, it was warm. Very warm. In fact, new data out Monday shows 2017 was the third warmest year recorded in the lower 48 states."

"And it was also a smackdown year for weather disasters: 16 weather events each broke the billion-dollar barrier."

"First, the heat. Last year was 2.6 degrees F warmer than the average year during the 20th century."

"That may be hard to remember in the thick of winter. But climate scientist Deke Arndt points out that even in a warm year, we still have frigid weather that invades from the north. "We still have very cold poles and we still have the same weather systems that pull cold air away from those poles into places where we live," he explains."

Monday
Jan082018

When The Cash Register Doesn't Take Cash

"General manager Erica Ritchie smiled politely before breaking the news to the young woman with a $10 bill in her hand."

"'We're actually cashless,' said Ritchie inside Bluestone Lane, a bright cafe in the shadow of City Hall in downtown Philadelphia."

"'Oh,' said the young woman, a bit sheepishly, before handing over a credit card to pay for her small coffee."

"By now, Ritchie is used to the exchange, though it's not terribly common anymore. Most of Bluestone's customers are regulars who come because it's close to work — and because they rarely carry cash. They like the reassurance in this food-crazed city that they won't need it."

"'I can't remember the last time I got out cash. Probably like a few weeks ago – a month ago? Maybe something like that,' said Samuel Foote, a social worker in the office building above the cafe, as he waited for banana toast. 'And it was like to give money to my father who doesn't have Venmo.'"

 

Sunday
Jan072018

It's Not Just A Cold, It's 'Sickness Behavior'

"It's just a cold. But even though I know I'm not horribly ill, I feel this overwhelming need to skip work, ignore my family and retreat to the far corner of the sofa."

"I'm not being a wimp, it turns out. Those feelings are a real thing called "sickness behavior," which is sparked by the body's response to infection. The same chemicals that tell the immune system to rush in and fend off invading viruses also tell us to slow down; skip the eating, drinking and sex; shun social interactions; and rest."

"'Those messages are so powerful they can't be ignored,' says Philip Chen, a rhinologist at the University of Texas, San Antonio. But that doesn't mean we don't try. Symptoms like a stuffy nose are obvious, Chen notes, but we're less aware that changes in mood and behavior are also part of our bodies' natural response to infection."

"It might behoove us to pay attention. There is plenty of evidence that having a cold impairs moodalertness and working memory and that brain performance falls off with even minor symptoms."

 

Saturday
Jan062018

NPR Host Robert Siegel Signs Off

"The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the median number of years that American workers have been working for their current employer is a little over four."

"I say that to acknowledge how unusual it is that I have been working at National Public Radio for a little over 40 years — 41, to be precise."

"For the past 30 years, I've been doing the same job: hosting All Things Considered. And doing it very happily."

"No one is more surprised by my tenure than I am."

"I came to NPR on what I thought was an unfortunate but necessary detour that — I hoped and figured — would last a couple of years."

"I'm a native New Yorker and the New York FM radio station where I worked was sold in 1976 and — to put it mildly — I didn't figure in the new owner's plans."

Friday
Jan052018

While The Eastern U.S. Freezes, It's Too Warm In Alaska

"While above-average temperatures might sound good to much of the U.S. right now, it's too warm in rural Alaska. High temperatures 10 to 20 degrees above average are upsetting everything from recreation to hunting for food."

"Last Saturday, Maurice Andrews won the Kuskokwim River's first sled dog race of the season."

"'It felt awesome, man,' Andrews said, 'Finally! Finally good to be out.'"

"The race in southwest Alaska had been scheduled to happen two weeks before. But warm weather — just above freezing — made the trails unsafe. Temperatures dropped and a dusting of snow fell. The entire race usually runs 35 miles up the frozen river. This time it had to run over land."

Thursday
Jan042018

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

"In Alaska, scientists have uncovered something they say is remarkable: the remains of two infants dating back more than 11,000 years."

"Their discovery is evidence of the earliest wave of migration into the Americas."

"'It's incredibly rare,' says Ben Potter, an archaeologist at the University of Alaska who is among the researchers on the project, at a site called Upward Sun River in central Alaska. 'We only have a handful of human remains that are this old in the entire Western Hemisphere.' The findings were published Wednesday by the journal Nature."

"The remains were in such good condition that geneticists were able to extract DNA from one of them. They compared the sample with the genes of people from around the world."

"They conclude that the ancestors of these infants started out in East Asia about 35,000 years ago. As they traveled east, they became genetically isolated from other Asians. At some point during the last ice age they crossed a frozen land bridge from Siberia to Alaska called "'Beringia.'"